Last But Not Least: Environmental Reading

By Ma’ayan D’Antonio

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Down Home Kitchen. Photo by Ma’ayan D’Antonio

As the rain tapped on the windows of Down Home Kitchen, the inside was abuzz with excitement and chatter. Down Home Kitchen, once a book store, was a fitting location for the last event of poetry month. On the menu was a hot cup of soup with a side of fresh corn bread, green salad and a large chocolaty brownie. The diners sat around the long wooden table enjoying the family style dining.

James Crews, Julia Shipley, Sean Prentiss and Jody Gladding are environmental poets, letting the place shape them as writer and as humans.

The first to step up to read was James Crews, as he took the mic, he nervously adjusted it admitting that mics stress him out. James read poetry for his husband who is a farmer as well as poetry about the places he has been to.

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From left to right, Sean Prentiss, Jody Gladding, Julia Shipley and James Crews. Photo by Rachel Senechal

As passersby walked past, they glanced curiously through the window to see Julia Shipley thank the captivated audience for taking part in PoemCity. She was kind enough to take into account that people were still eating. She chose to read “poems that one can hear while eating.” She laughed nervously. She admitted that she “is too in love with my puns” as she read us her new poem Glass Eye Factory, with a line that reads ‘blink and you miss it’.

Sean Prentiss, charming as ever, was kind enough to thank both his students from Norwich University and VCFA for coming down to support PoemCity. “Throw the double chocolate cookies at me” he said, in truth tomatoes just wouldn’t do. Sean read from his new poetry collection, poems that mostly read as love poems to nature and his wife.

Jody Gladding was the last poet to read that night, as the rain stopped and plates emptied, she handed out the poems that she was going to read from. Her new poetry looks strange and unconventional but the reading is beautiful and ever changing. With words spread out on the page there is no right or wrong way to read it, just the will to let it take you where it may.

After all that is what poetry is all about.

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