Watch the PoemCity Readings

Missed a reading, now thanks to ORCA Media you can watch them from the comfort of your own home.

“TIDAL_WAVE” Poetry Reading at the Kellogg-Hubbard Library on April 2.

Miraculum Monstrum with Kathline Carr at Bear Pond Books on April 3.

George Longenecker reading from Star Rout at the T.W. Wood Gallery on April 6.

Two Friends Reading with Pamela Harrison and Carol Westberg at the Kellogg-Hubbard Library on April 7.

Northern New England Poets Laureate: PoemCity Keynote Reading. With Chard deNiord, Alice B. Fogel and Stuart Kestenbaum at Loss Nation Theater on April 7.

Poems in Performance: A Cure for Poemphobia with Geof Hewitt at the Kellogg-Hubbard Library on April 12.

Vermont Poets at VCFA on April 15.

Alison Prine & Bianca Stone at Bear Pond Books on April 17.

Poerty Slam with Geof Hewitt on April 21.

Anything Goes Poetry Slam with Geof Hewitt at Loss Nation Theater on April 25

Daived Hinton reading poetry at the Kellogg-Hubbard Library on April 26.

 

 

 

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Workshopping with Kerrin McCadden

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Workshop in progress. Photo by Ma’ayan D’Antonio

By, Ma’ayan D’Antonio

Kerrin McCadden, is the author of Landscape with Plywood Silhouettes, winner of the Vermont Book Award and the New Issues Poetry Prize. As well as a resident of Montpelier. Kerrin held a workshop for reinventing poetry, a way to revise poetry. The workshop took place at the Kellogg-Hubbard Library on Monday, April 16. Kerrin, humble as she was introduced, wanted to know the participants’ names and where they are with their poetry. As each in turn said their name, they all talked in depth about where they are with their poem, someone even stated that they “accidentally wrote a poem”.

Kerrin, who mostly teaches high school kids finds it wired when grownups sit so still in front of her, “adults” she stated with a laugh. Geof Hewitt and Rick Agran (other PoemCity presenters) were also in attendance. “I’m always looking for new ways to look at poetry,” Agran said when he introduced himself.

Kerrin wanted the participants to be willing to think about how to make a poem work. As well as contemplate what makes a poem work? She explained that we don’t always know what is best for our poem, and at times a poem is not its best self. So how do you make it better? The more you push it around, the more it will tell you when it is done.

She presented an exercise to flex the ‘poet muscle’. To enable contrast try to fit five words that don’t necessarily work together in a poem, this will allow more room for the subconscious creativity to surface what we tend to keep back.

She gave different ways to reinvent a poem.

– Translate the poem into more then one language, then back to English and see what the end results bring. You might be surprised.

– Create tension by shifting focus.

– Take an old poem and write it a companion.

– Consider cutting the openings and endings of a poem and see what you are left with.

– Look at the large scale of the poem to create a new poem, you may find that the small things change into something even better- deeper.

– Change the order in which you give the information to the reader.

– Shift verb tense, try from the past to the future.

– Change the point of view from the I to him or you.

McCadden also suggests to look at a thesaurus, from different publications as well as different decades, to find new and interesting words to use.

Reinventing a Poem with Kerrin McCadden. A Workshop

On Monday, April 16, bring a draft of a poem you can’t figure out what to do with, and we will work through some revision strategies. We will share our poems and complain about them, and then we will make the biggest moves we can against their failures. I’ll bring the strategies, you bring a good-humored willingness to do more than tinker. Limited to 12 participants.

6 to 8 pm | Kellogg-Hubbard Library, 135 Main Street

Kerrin McCadden

Kerrin McCadden

Kerrin McCadden is the author of Landscape with Plywood Silhouettes, winner of the Vermont Book Award and the New Issues Poetry Prize. She is the recipient of a National Endowment for the Arts Literature Fellowship, a Vermont Studio Center Fellowship, and the Sustainable Arts Foundation Writing Award. Her poems have appeared in Best American Poetry, The Academy of American Poets’ Poem-a-Day series, Verse Daily, and in such journals as American Poetry Review, Beloit Poetry Journal, Horsethief, Prairie Schooner, and Rattle. She is the associate director of the Conference on Poetry and Teaching at The Frost Place and teaches at Montpelier High School. She lives in Montpelier, Vermont.

To register for the workshop: 

Please contact the library at (802) 223-3338.

Vermont Poets at VCFA

Come listen on Sunday, April 15 to some of Vermont’s finest voices as they read their poetry. Spend the afternoon with Megan Buchanan, Didi Jackson, Major Jackson, Kerrin McCadden, and Diana Whitney as they share their words, thoughts and emotions.

4 pm | VCFA, The Chapel, 36 College Street

MeganBuchanan

Megan Buchanan

Megan Buchanan  is the author of Clothesline Religion (Green Writers Press, 2017). Her work can be found in The Sun Magazine, make/shift, A Woman’s Thing, recent anthologies such as Dream Closet: Meditations on Childhood Space and Roads Taken: Contemporary Vermont Poetry, and numerous other publications. She’s also a collaborative performer, dancemaker, and high school English teacher who works with students with learning differences. She just received a 2018 Seedling Award from the Vermont Performance Lab to restage her interdisciplinary performance project called REGENERATIONS: Reckoning and Responding to the Closure of Vermont Yankee. Her work has been supported by the Vermont Arts Council, the Vermont Studio Center and the Arizona Commission on the Arts. She currently lives in Guilford, Vermont with her young son.

Kerrin McCadden

Kerrin McCadden

Kerrin McCadden is the author of Landscape with Plywood Silhouettes, winner of the Vermont Book Award, and the New Issues Poetry Prize. She is the recipient of a National Endowment for the Arts Literature Fellowship, a Vermont Studio Center Fellowship, and the Sustainable Arts Foundation Writing Award. Her poems have appeared in Best American Poetry, The Academy of American Poets’ Poem-a-Day series, Verse Daily, and in such journals as American Poetry Review, Beloit Poetry Journal, Horsethief, Prairie Schooner, and Rattle. She is the associate director of the Conference on Poetry and Teaching at The Frost Place and teaches at Montpelier High School. She lives in Montpelier, Vermont.

didi-jackson.jpg

Didi Jackson

Didi Jackson‘s poems have appeared in Ploughshares, Green Mountains Review, The Common, and Water~Stone Review among other publications.  Her manuscript, Almost Animal, (now Killing Jar) was a finalist for the Alice James Book Award, the Lexi Rudnitsky First Book Prize by Persea Books, and Autumn House Press. It was a semi-finalist for the Crab Orchard Open Book Prize, the Saturnalia Books Poetry Prize, and the University of Wisconsin Press Brittingham and Felix Pollack Prizes. Her chapbook, Slag and Fortune (2013), was published by Floating Wolf Quarterly. Currently, she teaches Poetry and the Visual Arts, 20th c. Poetry of War and Witness, and Creative Writing at the University of Vermont. 

Major Jackson

Major Jackson

Major Jackson is an American poet, professor, and the author of three collections of poetry: Holding Company (2010) and Hoops (2006), both finalists for an NAACP Image Award for Outstanding Literature-Poetry, and Leaving Saturn (2002), winner of the 2001 Cave Canem Poetry Prize and finalist for a National Book Critics Award Circle. He is also a recipient of a Whiting Writers’ Award and has been honored by the Pew Fellowship in the Arts and the Witter Bynner Foundation in conjunction with the Library of Congress. Jackson is the Richard Dennis Green and Gold Professor at University of Vermont and a core faculty member of the Bennington Writing Seminars. He served as a creative arts fellow at the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study at Harvard University, as the Jack Kerouac Writer-in-Residence at University of Massachusetts-Lowell and currently serves as the Poetry Editor of the Harvard Review.

Diana Whitney

Diana Whitney

Diana Whitney‘s first book, Wanting It (2014), became an indie bestseller and won the Rubery International Book Award in poetry. She’s the poetry critic for the San Francisco Chronicle and blogs about the darker side of motherhood for The Huffington Post. Diana’s work has appeared in The Boston Globe, Crab Orchard Review, Green Mountains Review, Ms. Magazine, The Rumpus, SalonThe Washington Post, and many more. She has been awarded writing grants and fellowships from the Sustainable Arts Foundation, the Vermont Arts Endowment Fund, and the Vermont Studio Center, and was the 2015 winner of the Women’s National Book Association poetry prize. A yoga teacher by trade, Diana runs a small studio attached to her farmhouse in Brattleboro, where she lives with her husband, two daughters, and three amiable cats. She’s currently finishing a memoir about motherhood and sexuality.

 

 

PoemCity 2018 Workshops

Introduction to Poetry Slams for Kids with Geof Hewitt:

Ever wonder what a Poetry Slam is? Join Vermont’s reigning slam master, Geof Hewitt, to learn about slams and write your own slam poem! It all happens on Thurs, April 12No limit for participants.

3:30 to 5 pm |Center for Art and Learning , 46 Barre Street

Introduction to Poetry Slams for Kids with Nicole Westbom:

Ever wonder what a Poetry Slam is?

Come join KHL Librarian Nicole Westbom, on SatApril 14, to learn about slams and write your own slam poem! Drop in for the workshop anytime between 2 and 4 pm. No limit for participants.

2 to 4 pm | Kellogg-Hubbard Library, 135 Main Street

*Then sign up for the Poetry Slam at the Center for Arts and Learning  that will take place on Sat, April 21 at 3:30 pm. 

Reinventing a Poem with Kerrin McCadden:

On Mon, April 16, bring a draft of a poem you can’t figure out what to do with, and we will work through some revision strategies. We will share our poems and complain about them, and then we will make the biggest moves we can against their failures. I’ll bring the strategies, you bring a good-humored willingness to do more than tinker. Limited to 12 participants.

6 to 8 pm | Kellogg-Hubbard Library, 135 Main Street

Poetry of Witness with George Longenecker :

Will take place on Fri April 20 Workshop. How do poets write about historical and political events without sounding preachy and prosy?  We’ll read examples of great poetry, and then create our own. Limited to 12 participants.

2-5 pm | Kellogg-Hubbard Library, 135 Main Street

Poetry Play Time with Rosa Castellano:

Join us on Fri, April 20 for Poetry Play Time. Though reading, writing, drawing and crafting we’ll play with some kid-friendly poems. Please bring any favorite poems to share over a snack. What a simple and enjoyable way to expose your children to the experience and mechanics of poetry! Ideal for children 7-11 years old. Limited to 16 participants.

3:00 pm | Kellogg-Hubbard Library, 135 Main Street

Reading Aloud- Exploring Poetic Voices with Rick Agran:

Learn to appreciate the rhythm and musicality of poetry and spoken word on Mon, April 23. Bon Mot host and radio producer, Rick Agran, will share recorded voices of contemporary poets to explore their sonic qualities. Poets are invited to bring a poem to share that’s voice they’d like to develop further. We’ll explore breath, annunciation, and diction to accentuate a poem’s language. Limited to 12 participants.

6:30 pm | Kellogg-Hubbard Library, 135 Main Street

Renga Poetry with Susan Reid:

Renga, meaning “linked poem,” began over seven hundred years ago in Japan to encourage the collaborative composition of poems. Come take part on Tues, April 24, to create a renga, one poet writes the first stanza, which is three lines long with a total of seventeen syllables. The next poet adds the second stanza, a couplet with seven syllables per line. The third stanza repeats the structure of the first and the fourth repeats the second, alternating in this pattern until the poem’s end. Limited to 24 participants.

3-5 pm| Kellogg-Hubbard Library, 135 Main Street

Poetry As Protest  with Simone John:

Poets Samantha Kolber and Michelle Singer will lead participants in an exploration of protest poetry, on Sat, April 28. Come with a theme or idea and write a poem in protest about your most passionate issue. We will give examples of three different forms your protest poem can take, discuss them, and then write our own. Limited to 12 participants.

10 am-noon | Kellogg-Hubbard Library, 135 Main Street

To register for the workshops: 

Please contact the library at (802) 223-3338 or come on it in person to the adult circulation desk.

 

Poetry on Tap: Beer, Bread and Soup

Come to Down Home Kitchen (100 Main St) for a special evening meal on April 25! Enjoy a delicious light supper made with local ingredients while listening to local poets Mary Elder Jacobsen, Kerrin McCadden, Emilie Stigliani, Alison Prine, and Kristin Fogdall. Supper begins at 6 pm; poetry begins at 7.

emilie-200Emilie Stigliani, currently an editor at the Burlington Free Press, has won several awards for her work, including a prize for environmental reporting from the Missouri Press Association and a fellowship from the Missouri School of Journalism.

 

 

alison-200Alison Prine’s poems have appeared in The Virginia Quarterly Review, Shenandoah, Harvard Review, Michigan Quarterly Review, and Prairie Schooner among others.  Her recently published debut collection of poems, Steel, won the Cider Press Book Award in 2014.

 

mej-200pxMary Elder Jacobsen is joining PoemCity again! Her poetry has appeared in GMR Online, The Cincinnati Review, The Antioch Review, The Greensboro Review, and other venues.

 

 

Poet Kristin Fogdall

Kristin Fogdall is also reading for PoemCity for a second time this month! Her work has appeared in Poetry, The New Republic, Slate.com, New England Review, and other journals; she is currently finishing a book-length collection.

 

 

Kerrin McCadden JPEG_BrowniePoetry200Kerrin McCadden is also joining us for a second time. She teaches at Montpelier High School and is the author of the Vermont Book Award‒winning collection of poetry Landscape with Plywood Silhouettes.

 

 

 

Poetry reading by alumni of the Vermont Studio Center

On April 20, at 7 pm, at the Lounge in VCFA’s Noble Hall at 39 College Street, Ryan Walsh, development and writing director at the Vermont Studio Center, hosts an evening of some of Vermont’s finest voices— Major Jackson, Kerrin McCadden, Baron Wormser, Julia Shipley, Kristin Fogdall, Diana Whitney and Laurie Macfee.

Each poet is an alum of VSC’s residency or Visiting Writer program. The reading will feature writers at every career level, from emerging to nationally celebrated. Poets will each share their work for 10 minutes, followed by an opportunity for conversation.

jackson5-200v (1)Major Jackson is a poet, professor, and the author of three collections of poetry: Holding Company, Hoops, and Leaving Saturn.

 

 

 

 

Kerrin McCadden JPEG_BrowniePoetry200Kerrin McCadden teaches at Montpelier High School and is the author of the Vermont Book Award‒winning collection of poetry Landscape with Plywood Silhouettes.

 

 

 

baron-200Baron Wormser is the former Poet Laureate of Maine and author and coauthor of numerous books, most recently in poetry Unidentified Sighing Objects and Impenitent Notes, and in prose Teach Us That Peace.

 

 

 

Julia & pup B&W taken by Howard Romero-2-200Julia Shipley is the cofounder of Chickadee Chaps & Broads and the author of poetry chapbook First Do No Harm and prose book Adam’s Mark.

 

 

 

DianaWhitneyheadshot-200Diana Whitney’s first book, Wanting It, became an indie bestseller and won the Rubery Book Award in poetry. Her poems and essays have appeared in The Boston Globe, Crab Orchard Review, The Rumpus, Salon, The Washington Post, and many more.

 

Poet Kristin Fogdall

Kristin Fogdall’s work has appeared in Poetry, The New Republic, Slate.com, New England Review, and other journals; she is currently finishing a book-length collection.

 

 

Laurie Macfee2-200Laurie Macfee was Writing Coordinator at VSC 2015-16 and continues as Grants Coordinator. She’s the designer and past poetry editor of Sierra Nevada Review, and poetry guest co-editor of Green Mountains Review 2016-17. Publications include Forklift, Ohio; Blue Lyra Review; Big Bell; Brushfire; and the anthology Change in the American West.

 

 

[edited to add Baron Wormser’s most recent poetry 4/23]